Invalid lincese after moving VM from one data center to another

May 31, 2017 at 3:02 PMVicent Galiana
Some months ago we had to move our servers from Germany to North Europe and recently windows is asking us to provide a valid product key. Running the command slmgr.vbs /dlv we could see that the registered KMS machine name was kms.core.cloudapp.de Apparently, for Nort Europe (at least) the server name must be kms.core.windows.net To change the licensing server, we have to run the following line in an elevated porwshell console: iex “$env:windir\system32\cscript.exe $env:windir\system32\slmgr.vbs /skms kms.core.windows.net:1688” Now we only have to wait a few minute and request a new license with the command: slmgr.vbs /ato That's it, as simple as that. Now our servers have a valid license again. P.S. We are not sure if the cause of the issue is the change of datacenter, but for sure, using the right license server fixed the issue.

Posted in: Azure

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Using Azure document Db as Mongo provider

December 6, 2016 at 7:23 PMVicent Galiana
Since Document DB started supporting Mongo's protocol I was wondering if we could have Sitecore running on Document DB. And today I managed to get it running. It threw a couple of exceptions the first time, but since then I don't see any error and, apparently, everything is working fine. (Of course, I Haven't tested it thoroughly).  The first step is creating the Database as a service for mongo on Azure Go to the portal and click on New Filter by "mongo" Select Database as a service for MongoDB Fill in your details for name, subscription, resource group and location Create the required databases Select the Resource you've just created. On the overview tab, you can only find the option to add collections. We don't need to create each of the collections, Sitecore will do it for use, but what we have to do is create the database. Go to the "Browse" section. Now you will see the option to "create database" on the top of the new blade. Create 4 new databases: Analytics Tracking_live Tracking_History Tracking_contact   Update the connection strings Get the connection string from Azure. Select the connection string option, from the settings section. Then copy the connection string from the bottom of the new blade   Replace your connection strings  Open your connection string file: ...Website\App_Config\ConnectionStrings.config Replace the connectionString for the connection analytics with the value you just copied from the portal. You will notice that this connection string is missing the database. To include the database, find the text "/?ssl=true" at the end of the string. We have to include the database after the "/". It should look like this: "xxxxxx/analytics?ssl=true"; Do the same for the other 3 databases. Save the file. Sitecore will re-start, but will throw errors like "Unable to connect to server Authentication failed because the remote party has closed the transport stream". This is because the mongo provider is not using configuring SSL correctly. We are lucky, Sitecore gives us the opportunity to set up the driver, before it uses it. Set up mongo provider to use SSL "Properly" You can follow these two links to implement your own solution or you can use mine from here.  Just drop this dll in the bin folder, and this config file in the app_settings/include folder That's it. Now your Sitecore will connect to DocumentDB and will start creating the required collections.  DocumentDB with support for mongo is still in preview, and this provider is not supported by Sitecore, so You shouldn't use it for production environments but if you are "playing" with Sitecore on Azure and you want to keep everything in Azure as Sitecore is doing with 8.2.1 supporting Azure webapps, Azure search, Azure Redis cache, etc.  with this trick, you can now use DocumentDB to store your collection database Please, let me know if you find errors using DocumentDB

Posted in: Azure | SiteCore

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Sitecore Azure Error Startup task ended with error 532462766

March 29, 2014 at 8:46 PMVicent Galiana
How to fix the error 532462766 [More]

Posted in: Azure | SiteCore

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Find out why your sitecore azure upgrade is failing with errors

October 3, 2013 at 2:15 PMVicent Galiana
Is your upgrade failing? You don't know why? This could be your answer... [More]

Posted in: Azure | SiteCore

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Enable Ifilters on a Sitecore farm on Azure

April 25, 2013 at 3:18 PMVicent Galiana
learn how to enable Ifilters on Sitecore Azure [More]

Posted in: Azure | SiteCore

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Enabling Sitecore log files on Azure PaaS

April 24, 2013 at 5:00 PMVicent Galiana
As we commented on previous post the default configuration of the Sitecore Azure module 2.0 moves the log files to table storage. We agree with this solution, as it's the best practice for Azure, but sometimes, it's easier to catch your bug, if you've the usual log files, even if you installed our ClearPeople Azure log viewer, by example is sitecore wants the logs of the last two days (Our ClearPeople Azure log Viewer will support this functionality shortly), so... what about sending the logs to table storage, but saving them to log files at same time? It's easy, open your deplument item in the content tree and edit the field "WebConfigPatch" find the text. Find the log4net section and add this text under the Azure appender: <appender name="LogFileAppender" type="log4net.Appender.SitecoreLogFileAppender, Sitecore.Logging">      <file value="$(dataFolder)/logs/log.{{date}}.txt"/>      <appendToFile value="true"/>      <layout type="log4net.Layout.PatternLayout">        <conversionPattern value="%4t %d{{ABSOLUTE}} %-5p %m%n"/>      </layout>    </appender> This is the standard appender, nothing new. Now, find the text "<appender-ref ref="AzureAppender" />" and add the next line under it: <appender-ref ref="LogFileAppender" /> That's it, you just configured the appender and told the engine to us both, so it will write to table storare and log file. In order to apply these changes properly, you need to "upgrade files" on your farm.

Posted in: Azure | SiteCore

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Enabling remote desktop on Sitecore farms on Azure PaaS

April 23, 2013 at 11:21 PMVicent Galiana
The first thing you need is to set up the service configuration file to load the "Remote desktop service". Doing it with the sitecore azure module 2.0 is easy; navigate to the item /sitecore/system/Settings/Azure/Environments/Your environment/your farm Edit the field service definition. Under the imports sections of the webrole, add these lines: <Import moduleName="RemoteAccess" /> <Import moduleName="RemoteForwarder" /> Now your service is able to execute the remote desktop, but now you need to configure how to run it. The first thing you need is a certificate, if you don't have a proper certificate, you can create one with IIS, following these steps Next, export the certificate using the Export option of IIS. Create and write down your password. Once you have the certificate, upload it to your cloud service following this guide. Yes, you're right, you need to deploy first without remote desktop to create the Cloud service and then, upgrade files in order to enable remote desktop. Once the certificate is uploaded, the certificate manager will show you a thumbprint. Copy it to some temp file, you'll need it. Now it's time to update the field "Service configuration: Under the configurationsettings of the role, add these three lines: <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.Enabled" value="true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteForwarder.Enabled" value="true" /> <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.AccountUsername" value="yourusername" /> Don't forget to change the username!The next line is used to specify the password of your remote desktop user, but this password must be encrypted first. You'll find how to do it here. Remember to use the thumbprint saved before.So, now, you can add the next line under the settings: <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.AccountEncryptedPassword" value=youreallylongencryptedpassword" />And the last line you've to add to your settings is, the expiry date for your user: <Setting name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.AccountExpiration" value="2029-12-31T23:59:59.0000000-08:00" />We're almost there... Time to tell your service to use the certificate previously uploaded:Under the <instances> section, add the next line:<Certificates> <Certificate name="Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Plugins.RemoteAccess.PasswordEncryption" thumbprint="yourthumbprint" thumbprintAlgorithm="sha1" /></Certificates> So this is it, now, "upgrade files" on your farm, and after the transitioning, you'll be able to connect to your VM. How?Connect to the azure manager, select your cloud service, go to instances tab, select one, and check the bottom of the page, you'll see a "Connect" button. Click it and it will download an rdp file to connect to your VM.Keep in mind you're not an administrator with full rights, and things are not always we're you expect...      

Posted in: Azure | SiteCore

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Reviewing Sitecore logs on Azure. ClearPeople Azure Log Viewer Module

April 23, 2013 at 4:14 PMVicent Galiana
When you use the Module Sitecore Azure 2.0 to move your Sitecore web site to Azure, you lose the log files and the old log viewer become useless. This module bring the logs back to Sitecore backend. [More]

Posted in: Azure | SiteCore

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